Kids4Dementia

K4D logo

#Kids4Dementia

The Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) has partnered with Kensington Public School to encourage adults to run, jog or walk with a child or teen in the 3.5km Family Fun Run or 10km Bridge Run on 17 September 2017 to raise money in support of the Kids4Dementia program (K4D).

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Currently a third of young people know someone living with dementia, and with 1.1 million Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050, their exposure to this chronic disease will only increase.

K4D is a classroom-based dementia education program designed for young people where students learn that a person with dementia is "still a person", and not someone to fear, laugh at or ignore.

Founder and Program Developer of K4D, Dr Jess Baker, reminds that our children are smart.

They are our future citizens who will grow up to be doctors, teachers and leaders of tomorrow. Educating children about dementia is the foundation to a dementia-friendly society.
Dr Jess Baker, Founder and Program Developer of K4D

A dementia-friendly society is a vision shared by many researchers, practitioners, educators and consumers. It is a society where people with dementia are recognised as valued citizens and supported to remain meaningfully engaged with the community and in daily life.

CHeBA's immediate vision is to support Dr Baker roll out the program across 30 schools in NSW.

All funds raised will assist this critical program to be implemented throughout schools across all states in Australia. Ultimately Dr Baker's goal is for this program to become part of the primary school curriculum.

Please help us to transform how children view and understand people with dementia by walking, jogging or running with us or donating to the cause! By doing so you are supporting a brighter future for dementia and promoting positive ageing and a healthy lifestyle across all ages!

Join the team today! Thanks for your support.

Click here for instructions on how to join Team CHeBA and to set up your fundraising page!

When: Sunday 17 September
Where: Start at Bradfield Park (conveniently right near Milson's Point Station) and finish at the Sydney Opera House.
Time: The 10km Bridge Run starts at 8am and the 3.5km Family Fun Run starts at 9.30am

This event is open to ALL ages and we are encouraging everyone to walk or jog with a child in the 3.5km Family Fun Run or 10km Bridge Run. We are looking for each duo or family to raise $1,500 towards our overall fundraising goal of $30,000. If you are looking for more of a challenge, you are more than welcome to participate in the half or full marathon and still raise money.

Background Information

In the Kids4Dementia Program, children will have fun learning about dementia through the engaging animated story of Ollie a 9-year old boy, Ruby his 12-year-old sister, and their Pops - who they have noticed is starting to act a little differently than usual. The program also features videos of people with dementia and child relatives of people with dementia talking candidly about the condition.

The program has 7 short modules, covering topics that interest children such as:

image - Kids4Dementia

Each module is accompanied by a class activity, such as an interactive brain, discussion, role-play or drawing.

Why is it important to get dementia education into schools?

  • A third of young people know someone living with dementia, and with 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050, it is likely that the majority of today's youths will come to know or meet the condition in their lifetime.
  • Two thirds of children tell us that they would like to help someone with dementia but that a lack of understanding could be holding them back, and that they are keen to know more about the condition.
  • The stigma experienced by people living with dementia is real and common. Over 55% of children believe that if people knew more about dementia life would be better for those with the condition.

 

For more information please contact h.douglass@unsw.edu.au

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