Blog: The Brain Dialogues, filtered by tag: Sydney Memory and Ageing Study

10 Sep 2020

Dr Tharusha Jayasena | Meet Our Researcher Series

Diet is a key modifiable lifestyle factor to achieve healthier cognitive ageing. There is a wealth of evidence indicating the benefits of adopting a Mediterranean diet for improved brain health. Traditional Mediterranean diets have historically contained moderate amounts of fat, much of it from healthful monounsaturated fats (such as extra virgin olive oil and almonds), omega-3 fats (in foods like oily fish/seafood and walnuts), and polyunsaturated fats in other nuts and seeds. Levels of fatty acids found in blood have been reported to be altered in patients with mild cognitive impairment and… Read More
10 Sep 2020

Virginia Winter | Meet Our Researcher Series

With the world’s ageing population increasingly affected by dementia, CHeBA’s Sydney Memory and Ageing Study offers a rich dataset to explore the nature of dementia and predictors of cognitive decline to mediate the impact of the disease. With over 1,000 participants involved in the study, Research Assistant Virginia Winter can attest to how fascinating and valuable CHeBA’s study participants are. She notes that the generous ongoing donation of their time to research, to support future generations, is inspiring.   How did you get into researching the ageing brain? While completing my… Read More
19 Jun 2020

Russell Chander | Meet Our Researcher Series

There is a large body of evidence to suggest that our ability to socialise and maintain positive relationships throughout the lifespan is affected by, and can have an effect on, ageing. Becoming part of an international collaborative effort to better understand the impact of social skills in later life on cognitive decline and dementia is what motivates Russell Chander; PhD student at CHeBA.   How did you get into researching the ageing brain? I became aware of a Research Assistant job through a friend from university that was working at a Neurology clinic. This would be the first job I… Read More
19 Jun 2020

Dr Adam Bentvelzen | Meet Our Researcher Series

The context of healthcare has certainly shifted in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and there is now a huge demand for flexibility when it comes to accessing practitioners and treatment. Dr Adam Bentvelzen is pioneering the way for alternative avenues of accessibility to healthcare services, particularly phone-based cognitive screening. He has been investigating this as a means of assessing patients with possible dementia who are geographically isolated or physically limited. This method has been successfully implemented for over ten years with participants in CHeBA’s Sydney Memory and Ageing… Read More
20 May 2020

Dr Katya Numbers | Meet Our Researcher Series

Changing the stereotypical narratives of ageing throughout the lifespan is what motivates Dr Katya Numbers, Coordinator of CHeBA’s Sydney Memory and Ageing Study (MAS). Though we cannot expect an entirely positive experience of ageing, the key is to hold more realistic views so that we can welcome and embrace growing older. Much of Dr Numbers’ work examines the discrepancy between subjective impressions of cognitive decline and objective measures of cognitive performance in older adults.   How did you get into researching the ageing brain? It has been somewhat of a long and strange… Read More
6 Aug 2019

Subjective Cognitive Complaints and Dementia

HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au Study Co-Ordinator of CHeBA’s Sydney Memory & Ageing Study, Dr Katya Numbers, was invited to present on participants’ subjective experience of cognitive decline at the 4th Annual Australia Dementia Forum 2019 Conference (ADF) in Hobart in June. The Sydney Memory and Ageing Study began in 2005 to examine clinical characteristics and prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and to determine the rate of change of cognitive function over time. Since its inception, the study has included over 1,000 older adult Sydney residents making it one of the… Read More
5 Jun 2019

School of Psychiatry Academics Recognised by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatry (RANZCP)

Professor Brian Draper receive his award from outgoing RANZCP President Dr Kym Jenkins
Professor Brian Draper receive his award from outgoing RANZCP President Dr Kym Jenkins
HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au Two of UNSW’s School of Psychiatry and Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) academics, Professor Brian Draper and Professor Julian Trollor, were acknowledged for significant contributions to psychiatry at the recent RANZCP Congress held on Monday, 13th May 2019. Professor Brian Draper, a Chief Investigator on CHeBA’s Sydney Memory & Ageing Study, was awarded the RANZCP’s College Medal of Honour for his outstanding contribution to psychiatry as a clinician and researcher, and for his extensive and continuous service to the RANZCP. Established in… Read More

Does Social Interaction Reduce Risk of Dementia?

DR ANNE-NICOLE CASEY How people interact with and perceive one another, and each person’s thoughts and feelings about the quality of those interactions and relationships, can affect physical and mental health and well-being. Social cognitive function, which broadly refers to the way our brain processes social information, is recognised as an important marker of how efficiently our brain processes information in general1. Interestingly, the number of individuals with whom a person interacts frequently is associated with their short-term memory capacity2. Some studies report that having larger… Read More

Exploiting Big Data for Dementia Research

PROFESSOR PERMINDER SACHDEV This article was first published in InformAge, Volume 2, Issue IV December 2015 (Summer). Dementia is a global problem, and there is a worldwide effort to identify risk and protective factors, determine early biomarkers, and develop novel treatments for dementia. A survey of the international research scene reveals that many groups are working in relative isolation on projects that are similar to research conducted elsewhere. Very often, the individual projects are not large enough to provide conclusive answers to complex research questions. A recent… Read More

Donating Your Brain to Research

HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au There are currently approximately 320,000 people in Australia with dementia, with that number set to rise to almost one million by 2050, and 115 million globally. These predictions mean that not only do we need a clear plan to make care available for so many people with dementia, but we also need to pursue prevention strategies vigorously. Prevention of dementia depends largely upon research, and beyond the necessities of funding, equipment, and academics with the right skill base to perform the research we need one extra thing: brains. "Even before… Read More