Blog: The Brain Dialogues, filtered by tag: Alzheimer's Disease

Does Social Interaction Reduce Risk of Dementia?

DR ANNE-NICOLE CASEY How people interact with and perceive one another, and each person’s thoughts and feelings about the quality of those interactions and relationships, can affect physical and mental health and well-being. Social cognitive function, which broadly refers to the way our brain processes social information, is recognised as an important marker of how efficiently our brain processes information in general1. Interestingly, the number of individuals with whom a person interacts frequently is associated with their short-term memory capacity2. Some studies report that having larger… Read More
3 Nov 2016

Cognitive Decline Across Different Countries – COSMIC

DARREN LIPNICKI The Cohort Studies of Memory in an International Consortium (COSMIC) is a collaborative effort of researchers from around the world. We identify important topics for research, and share data from longitudinal, population-based studies of cognitive ageing to create a better understanding of what causes dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Our current project is investigating whether there are differences between countries in how fast cognitive functioning declines in older individuals. Such differences could help explain why the prevalence of dementia varies around the… Read More
3 Nov 2016

Research Check: Can Drinking Coffee Reduce Your Dementia Risk?

PROFESSOR HENRY BRODATY MB, BS PROFESSOR CLARE COLLINS This article was originally published on 14 October 2016 in The Conversation. Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, is a growing problem worldwide. There are 350,000 people with dementia in Australia and this is set to rise to 900,000 by 2050. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. So if “coffee really can help to prevent dementia”, as a headline by the Daily Mail last week suggested, that would be amazing. This is why the study on which the headline was basedreceived so much interest. It was reported on by… Read More
26 Jul 2016

City2Surf First Timers Run for Mum

HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au At the age of just 61, a mother of three adoring children and seven beautiful grandchildren was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.  Her specialist physician was CHeBA Co-Director Professor Henry Brodaty.  A mere five years on and this loving Mum, Suellen Grellman,  is now living in a high care nursing home and requires assistance with everything that she does, including eating and drinking.  Understandably, Suellen’s daughter, Sarah Holmes, has found this journey tough.  “Watching my vibrant, confident, intelligent Mum deal and… Read More
28 Jun 2016

Blood Test for Alzheimer’s: Close Or Hype?

This article was originally published in the The Conversation on 28 July 2016 Anyone who has ever visited a doctor’s office is familiar with the use of blood tests for the diagnosis of various diseases. Because blood comes in contact with all organs of the body, it carries markers of the health of these organs. It is an easily accessible body fluid, can be drawn repeatedly to follow the progress of a disease and, in most cases, blood tests are relatively inexpensive. It is therefore not surprising news that a possible blood test for dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, gets much… Read More
17 Dec 2015

Standardised Approach Needed to Validate miRNAs Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

HEIDI DOUGLASS | h.douglass@unsw.edu.au Failure to use a standardised approach is limiting the effectiveness of research into whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can be used as a blood biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease.  Researchers at the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at UNSW Australia conducted a systematic review investigating research into miRNAs as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and found that few studies assessed the same miRNAs and where they did, methodological differences between the studies made it hard to validate findings. The research, led by CHeBA PhD student Dr… Read More
16 Apr 2014

The Good-ish News About Alzheimer's Disease

ADELE HORIN Of all the things Australians fear, cancer is number one and dementia is number two. For me the order is reversed. I’ve had cancer (radiation, chemotherapy, lumpectomy). I’ve seen people die of cancer. It’s not easy or pretty. But I’ve also seen people die slowly of dementia – whether Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia, it doesn’t matter. Dementia holds a particular horror because it robs people of their intellect, their personality, their memory, their speech, their essential self. Cancer sufferers, on the other hand, remain recognisably themselves through the experience,… Read More
19 Mar 2013

What's New in Alzheimer's? Pacing the Brain

PROFESSOR PERMINDER SACHDEV, MD, PhD As a clinician, I regularly advise my patients with memory problems to keep mentally and socially active; “keep stimulating your brain” is the message. There could be a new twist to the notion of brain stimulation if some of the current research proves to be beneficial. The National Institute of Health in the United States recently funded a study of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s. DBS is not a new technique, and it is regularly used to treat Parkinson’s disease and some other movement disorders. It involves the placement of… Read More